Frequently Asked Questions


We will prepare your SLA application for a reasonable flat-rate fee. This fee varies depending on your location, size, scope of business, and your specific needs. Our fee does not include SLA license and filing fees, or attorney’s fees.

For a quote call 888-252-2830.

Yes & No
You must provide us with truthful answers to our questions and you must provide us with documents required by the SLA. You have to be fingerprinted. Our consultants do everything else for you. Electronic fingerprinting is now offered statewide. It is more convenient and it speeds up the application process.

No. The license applications that we submit are correct at the time the application is submitted. We can not expedite an application that you have submitted in error to the NYS Liquor Authority. If an application is submitted to the Authority with errors, it will be returned and the Authority may keep your fees. You may then be required to start the process from the beginning, including paying the same fees all over again!

The Members of the Authority have approved the implementation of a Self Certification Program. This program allows attorneys filing retail applications on behalf of applicants to certify that statements and documents provided in an application are true and accurate, and that the application meets all statutory requirements.

The program will allow for a more timely review of applications as the agency will rely on the information certified by the Attorney, eliminating the need to review each document submitted. We can refer you to attorneys that will review the application we have prepared for you. The attorney will then make a visit to the premises to verify the accuracy of the application. The attorney will then certify and submit the application.

Yes. On many occasions, a client will go to an attorney for assistance with starting or purchasing an alcohol related business. Attorneys frequently call on our consultants to assist with the ABC license application. We are not attorneys. We always recommend that a client consult with an attorney for purchase offers, leases, incorporation, partnership agreements etc.

No. This is commonly referred to as 'B.Y.O.B.' or 'Bring Your Own Bottle.' Customers cannot be permitted to bring their own alcohol into your restaurant before you are issued your liquor license.

This license allows sale of beer in a drug store or grocery store for off-premises consumption.

In New York, there is no such thing as “transferring” a liquor license with the exception of a "C" license; all other licenses cannot be sold or passed on to a new owner. The State Liquor Authority only uses the term “transfer” to distinguish between applications where a licensed establishment is selling its business or business assets to a new operator, from applications where an operator seeks a license for a location that is not currently licensed. Regardless of the designation given to an application, the process is essentially the same.

This license allows the sale of beer or wine “products,” which include added ingredients or juices, such as wine coolers.

The sale of beer is incidental to the sale and consumption of food.

The operator of a hotel may apply for a license to sell beer to patrons, either in a bar, room service, or for take-out.

Club beer. The operator of a club may sell beer to its members. For the purpose of this license, a “club” is not a nightclub but is rather an organization of members for a common purpose, such as an Elks Club or VFW.

For on-premises sale and consumption of beer at baseball fields, racetracks or other similar athletic venues.

License to produce or brew up to 60,000 barrels of beer. May include sale to licensees. Does not include retail sale to consumers.

Allows on-site brewing and sale of beer at an operating pub or restaurant.

Allows a restaurant brewer to sell for off-premises consumption or events.

The operator of a restaurant may sell wine and beer to customers.

Allows on-premises sale of wine in a hotel bar, lounge or room service.

Allows on premises sale of wine or beer for club members.

Allows sale for on-premises consumption of wine or beer at a tavern.

License to sell wine only (not beer or liquor) for off-premises consumption. 

Five different licenses allow for the sale of liquor, as opposed to wine or beer. The selection of the license class will depend on the type of establishment that you wish to operate.

This license is for the sale of liquor and wine (not beer) for off-premises consumption.

Allows on-premises consumption of liquor in a hotel bar, lounge or room service.

Allows for on premises consumption of liquor for club members.

This license allows on-premises consumption of liquor, wine or beer, as at a traditional bar. Food must be available for sale.

Allows on-premises consumption of liquor, wine or beer at an establishment that provides primarily musical entertainment. Must have a capacity of at least 600 people.

This permit allows the sale of wine and beer for a single 24-hour period for consumption at a particular event.

A caterer who provides food for an event may obtain a 24-hour license to furnish wine, liquor or beer.

Similar to a caterer’s permit, but specifically to cater an event at an established club.

Someone who already holds another liquor license may apply for a special permit to host an overnight event and provide alcohol. This permit is available for New Year’s Eve only.

A charitable, religious, civic or educational organization may obtain a permit to sell alcoholic beverages in sealed containers, not for consumption at the event.